Venison Stew

 

Venison_Stew_2014

I was tempted to call this recipe Venison Bourguignon but since I did not use a Burgundy wine, I felt like an imposter. Although the famous Julia Child didn’t have that issue, you’ll see in the recipe she offers other choices of wines to braise this dish with. Personally, I decided to go with a more humble name for this fantastically flavorful dish. It probably doesn’t do it justice because it is so darn good!

I followed Julia Child’s instructions for Boeuf A La Bourguignonne pretty much to a T, but added some extra spices that go especially well with venison and also changed the main ingredient.

Long time readers of this blog know of my passion for knowing where my food comes from and honoring it by making sure to purchase from as many local farms as I can, or use what we grow ourselves.

I love venison but it is not easy to get. There are deer farms here in Vermont, but the farmers have difficulty getting them processed because of their antlers, so although you can find VT venison in the high-end stores on occassion, it isn’t ever a regular thing. Some of you know I have even tried my hand at bow hunting deer, unsuccessfully, which is the way I would prefer to procure my venison…maybe someday.

Due to its scarcity and my love for it, when I do get my hands on some, either from a store or from friends who have a surplus from hunting, I always treat it with the most respect. Roberto and I often talk about how disappointed we are if we go out to eat and the meal was not all it could be. As animals on this planet, we as humans must eat living things in order to live ourselves. This is something we take seriously in this household and so for us, when food is not treated with respect and done well, we always feel a sense of sadness. Therefore, when I am able to get a rare treat, like venison, I will take the extra time to do all the little steps necessary to bring it to its highest potential, like this venison stew.

I always do my best to treat all my food with the respect it deserves. Cooking is definitely part of my spiritual life. Sometimes, I will take less steps if it is made from something more readily available. But with the venison it was important for me to take those extra steps. So that is why I took extra time to prepare this the way Julia Child did. I often enjoy making meals with “extra steps” on Sundays – we make a general rule of staying home on Sundays and so it is nice to have the extra time to play in the kitchen.

I also added some wild game blend seasoning I have to this dish. It is a mixture of juniper berry, brown sugar, garlic, savory and mustard powder as well as a hint of beau monde, a typical French seasoning that compliments hearty stews. I also added a turnip. I added these extra components because they go great with venison and stews and we like adding them. Although I also like respecting classic recipes and following them (one of the only times I actually follow a recipe, because classics are hard to improve upon), I also believe in using what you like and in Julia Child’s Bourguignon it is more about the techniques than the seasonings. Plus Julia was a bit of a renegade so I don’t think she minds.

Venison Stew
(Serves 5)

INGREDIENTS:

3 oz. organic bacon, if you don’t have a local source, I recommend Applegate Farms Organic
1 TBS olive oil
1 lb. of venison stewing meat, cut into 2-inch cubes
1 carrot, cubed
1 turnip, cubed
1 onion, diced
1 tsp salt
¼ tsp black pepper
1 tsp wild game blend
1 tsp beau monde
1 TBS buckwheat flour (or any other flour of your choice, I used buckwheat because I had some leftover freshly ground)
1 cup full bodied red wine (Julia recommends: Chianti, Beaujolais, Cotes du Rhone or Burgundy, she also recommends accompanying this meal with one of those)
1 cup of beef stock, preferably homemade
1 TBS tomato paste
1 clove smashed garlic
½ tsp thyme
a crumbled bay leaf
1 lb. quartered fresh mushrooms that have been sautéed in butter

METHOD: Preheat oven to 325 F. Then cut bacon into small square pieces and sauté in oil over moderate heat for 2-3 minutes to brown slightly. Remove to a side dish with a slotted spoon.

Dry the venison in paper towels; if the meat is damp it won’t brown. Sauté it a few pieces at a time in the hot oil and bacon fat, adding more if needed (depends on how fatty your bacon is – pasture raised and organic bacons tend to be lean and therefore don’t produce as much fat) until nicely browned on all sides. Add it to the reserved bacon.

In the same fat, brown all the vegetables. If you have excess fat at this time, drain it from the pan.

Speaking of pans, I used my Le Creuset Enameled Cast-Iron Moroccan Tagine to make this recipe, I use it for all of my stews, unless I am using my crockpot. You can also use a Dutch oven, but in any case your vessel must be oven proof.

Return beef and bacon to the pan with the veggies. At this point you can also add your sautéed mushrooms. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and all your spices and toss. Then sprinkle on the flour and toss again to coat everything. Adding the flour will slightly thicken the liquid as it cooks.

In a separate bowl combine the wine, broth and tomato paste. Pour over the meat mixture, and then add the smashed garlic, thyme and bay leaf. Bring to a simmer on top of the stove. Then set the lid on the casserole and set in the lower third of the preheated oven. Simmer for 2 ½ to 3 hours, checking every 45 minutes or so for liquid. With the tagine, you don’t have to worry, but if you are using something else, check. Add more broth or wine as necessary. As Julia also often recommended, have some wine yourself at this point, while the dish cooks!

Julia recommends serving this dish the boiled potatoes as is tradition, but says it can also be served with rice or buttered noodles. If you wish to serve a vegetable with it, she recommends buttered peas – so do I!

This dish can also be made ahead. To reheat, simmer for about 10-15 minutes, making sure to keep an eye on the liquid amount.

Meaty Minestrone Soup

 

Meaty Minestrone

I know I have been promising this soup recipe for some time now, and since many of us are still experiencing winter weather, I decided it is still relevant for the season!

This is a great way to use your homemade bone broth. It is loaded with lots of delicious vegetables and the combination of grass-fed beef and pastured pork sausage makes it very hearty. So hurry up and make some today before the weather gets warm again!

Meaty Minestrone

INGREDIENTS:

1 pound of grass-fed beef
½ lb of sausage (I used homemade Italian sausage : Pap-Pap’s Italian Sausage made with pastured pork)
3 cups of mushrooms (I used baby bellas, cut in half)
4 cloves of garlic, minced
2 TBS olive oil
6 cups of homemade bone broth (I used a pork and chicken combination)
5 small potatoes, chopped small
8 carrots, chopped small
1 can of organic diced tomatoes
½ can of organic tomato paste
1 cup of sun-dried or oven-dried tomatoes
2 cups of organic spinach (or other greens)
1 TBS of red wine vinegar
1 TBS Beau Monde seasoning
1TBS dried sage
salt and pepper to taste

METHOD: Sautee the beef, sausage, mushrooms and garlic in olive oil until the meat is browned and the mushroom are a little soft. Salt to taste before adding to the broth. Meanwhile, in a soup pot, bring broth to boiling and cook the potatoes and carrots for about 15 minutes. Add the beef and sausage mixture to the pot. Stir in the tomatoes, tomato paste and sun dried tomatoes and let cook for about 10-15 minutes. Then add the greens, red wine vinegar and seasonings. Cook another 5 -10 minutes, until flavors are incorporated and greens have wilted. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Serves 8-10

Easy Techniques To Make Super Gelatinous Bone Broth!

Bone Broth

SUPER Gelatinous Bone Broth

There is a lot going around these days about the health benefits of eating bone broth and, or gelatin (aka collagen). Bone broth contains gelatin, which in turn contains the amino acids glycine and proline. These amino acids are found in the bone, connective tissue and organs of animals. Our ancestors used to consume these parts of the animals they ate, but modern diets don’t usually include them, which is a shame because gelatin is great for our skin, nails, hair, joints and even our digestive organs, which directly relates to our immunity.

This article  discusses the many health reasons to consume gelatin, including, digestive health, releasing toxins and wound healing. It also gives suggestions for how to incorporate it into your diet.

I stated taking collagen when I was pregnant with my daughter. I started craving jello at about 4 months – and it made me think, why am I craving this? The main ingredient in jello is gelatin and what is gelatin good for? Bones. I was craving jello because I was literally growing my daughter’s bones, skin, joints and teeth. If that doesn’t put “you are what you eat” into perspective, I don’t know what does! I always say collagen is the reason why she is in a very high percentile for height! This post is not officially a part of my Post-partum Foods series, but it should be! If you know someone who is pregnant, make a batch of bone broth for her!

When anyone I know asks me what they can do for immunity, or especially if they are having digestive issues or joint issues, one of the first things I suggest is eating bone broth because it is so easy to make and so good for you! In fact both of my parents managed to break bones this year from accidents, and I made sure they both got some collagen to take during the healing processI make sure to include bone broth in our family meals, mostly in the way of soups and stews, but I also take this collagen* every day, stirred into my morning hot drink (usually Dandy Blend, sometimes Lavazza Decaf). 

So now that you are getting a general idea of why it is so important to add bone broth, or gelatin/collagen to your diet, how easy is it to make it? SIMPLE. It is one of the easiest things to make.

In my house, I am known affectionately as “the bone collector”. At any given time we have lots of bones in our freezer. We also have lots of whole chickens in our freezer, because we homestead and raise our own meat birds. Some years we have to “turn over” our laying hens when they stop producing eggs, and these hens are usually too small to roast, so I will use them to make bone broth. I also collect bones from other meals and sometimes buy beef bones from our favorite farm. The point is you have a lot of options when it comes to getting your raw materials. Collect bones, freeze them and then pull them out whenever you need to make more broth. I often mix and match my bones; one of my favorite broths to make is a chicken and pork broth, which is what I used to make the soup I will share with you in my next post.

All you need to make your own bone broth are: bones, apple cider vinegar (preferably raw), water and a crockpot.

Step 1: Place bones or whole chicken in the crockpot
Step 2: Cover bones and or chicken with water
Step 3: Pour in 1 TBS of raw apple cider vinegar (at this point you could also add seasoning, I like to season simply with salt, pepper and one or two bay leaves)
Step 4: Turn Crockpot on High setting and let cook for 24-48 hours.
Step 5: After 12 hours, put crockpot on the Low setting
Step 6: Strain broth and store

If you used a whole chicken, you can now take the meat off the bones and reserve to make classic chicken soup,  chicken tostadas, even my Moroccan chicken salad or throw it in some pasta! Then I store all the skin, tendons and other less desirable pieces to mix in with my pets’ food. I burn the brittle bones in our wood stove. This means there is never any waste.

This is a simple process that is mostly hands off, very cheap (you already bought it!) and so good for your health. There really is no reason not to do it! Plus, if you have pets they will literally love you forever!

Post-Partum Freezer Meals: Eggplant and Spiced Meat Bake

 

Eggplant and Spiced Meat Bake

The Mediterranean flavors are still on my mind and today’s post I will share with you a delicious casserole dish that is easy to assemble and cook, but tastes like you spent hours putting it together. This is a great addition to your post-partum freezer meal list because it is one of those dishes that tastes even better a day or two later after the flavors have really had a chance to marry, and there are some really great flavors! If you aren’t going to freeze this for later use, please make sure you make enough for leftovers, or you are really missing out!

This recipe is based loosely on Moussaka. It has all the same elements, the tomatoes, the béchamel and the spiced meat. However, I didn’t have any ground lamb, as is traditional, so I used what I did have – buffalo meat. You could use ground beef, lamb or even ground turkey in this dish and it would taste great!

When choosing your eggplant, smaller is always less bitter, yet even so I still salt and drain them before cooking to take any bitterness out. I used graffiti eggplants in this dish, I really like the flavor and they have a great melting quality to them when cooked, which is perfect for this dish. You can easily spot them because they are tear shaped and have variegated coloring of purple and white.

I hope you enjoy this hearty, delicious and simple dish!

INGREDIENTS:

3 medium eggplants, cut into thin rounds
salt
¼ cup olive oil
1 small onion, diced
4 cloves of garlic, minced
1 pound of ground meat
1 tsp of ground cinnamon
1 tsp of Beau Monde (contains, cloves, cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, bay leaf and pepper)
2 hand fulls of arugula
1 – 28 ounce can of diced tomatoes

¼ tsp nutmeg
1 cup of organic yogurt (I used homemade goat yogurt)
3 eggs

METHOD: Cut the eggplant into thin rounds, place in a colander and mix with about a tsp of salt. Let rest for 20 minutes. While the eggplant is resting, preheat the oven to 400 F. After 20 minutes, rinse the eggplant and squeeze out any excess moisture. Stir the eggplant in a bowl with 2 TBS of olive oil. Place on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 20 minutes.

Heat the rest of the oil in a skillet sauté the onion and garlic until translucent, then add the meat and spices and cook until nice and browned. Then add the arugula and the tomatoes. Simmer the sauce for about 20 minutes, or until it gets nice and thick. Salt and pepper to taste.

While the sauce is cooking whisk together the nutmeg, eggs and yogurt. This is in place of a traditional béchamel sauce.

Place a thin layer of eggplant in a large glass baking dish and then put a layer of the meat sauce. Continue to do this until all the ingredients are used up – in the same manner you would make lasagna – end with a layer of eggplant. Then add the yogurt mixture on top.

Place in the oven on the middle rack and bake for about 45- 50 minutes, until the top is golden brown. Let it rest for about 10 minutes before cutting into it.

Serves 6

Shredded Lemon-Yogurt Chicken over Grain-Free Naan with Garlicky Tzatziki

 

Shredded Chicken on Naan with Tzatziki

(Shredded Lemon-Yogurt Chicken over Grain-Free Naan with Garlicky Tzatziki)

Sometimes in the dead of winter, you long for something sunny and bright. During winter’s darkness I often become hungry for the bright sunny tastes of the Mediterranean.

On a recent trip to Costco we were excited to find organic chicken – breasts and thighs. This might not sound very exciting, but when you raise your own chickens for meat (and eggs!) most of the time the only chicken meals you really make are whole roasted chickens or chicken soup. When you free-range your chickens they don’t tend to get as nice and plump and so the breasts and other parts tend to be on the smaller side. So we were excited to find decent quality chicken cuts for very good prices at Costco to add some diversity to our dinners.

Having various cuts of chicken is a luxury for us and so I wanted to do something fun with the meat. I made several slices into each breast and stuffed them with slices of meyer lemon. Then I rubbed the breasts with a mixture of homemade goat yogurt, salt, garlic, oregano, mint and lemon juice. I baked the breasts in the oven until the meat could be easily shredded. Then I served the shredded meat on top of grain free naan bread with slices tomatoes, cucumbers and arugula and then topped the whole thing off with homemade tzatziki.

This meal really hit the spot! It was comprised of all the flavors I was looking for without taking a long time to make. Cooking with an infant in the house means cooking in stages. I made the naan earlier in the day – easy to reheat later. I also made the tzatziki early, so the garlic had time to really penetrate the yogurt. I decided to bake the chicken so it was very hands off. Then at the end I just had to pull the whole thing together.

I served it with a simple side of oven roasted eggplant dices.

Lemon-Yogurt Chicken Breasts

INGREDIENTS:

2 organic chicken breasts
¼ cup plain organic yogurt (cow, goat, non-dairy)
2 TBS lemon juice
2 cloves of garlic, minced
salt to taste
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp dried mint
drizzle of good extra virgin olive oil

METHOD: Place chicken breasts in a shallow baking dish and mix with all the ingredients. Let sit in the refrigerator to marinate for at least 2 hours. Preheat oven to 350 F. Place baking dish with chicken and marinade in the oven and cover, bake for 45 minutes until meat is tender enough to shred.

Tzatziki

INGREDIENTS:

1 ½ cup plain organic yogurt (cow, goat, non-dairy)
2 TBS lemon juice
½ of an English (seedless) cucumber, shredded
5 cloves of garlic, shredded or grated
salt to taste
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp dried mint
drizzle of good extra virgin olive oil

METHOD: Mix all ingredients together in a bowl and place in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours before serving.

Oven Roasted Eggplant Dices

INGREDIENTS:

2 small eggplants, diced and salted
extra virgin olive oil

METHOD: Preheat oven to 400 F. Dice the eggplant and place in a colander, lightly salt the eggplant and let sit for about 20 minutes. In 20 minutes rinse the eggplant and squeeze the pieces to get the water out. Place on a cookie sheet and drizzle with olive oil. Roast for about 25-30 minutes or until golden brown. Salt to taste.

Grain-Free Naan Bread

I have used both of these recipes and they are great for this purpose!

Grain Free Garlic Naan (Gluten/Yeast/Nut/Dairy Free) by Real Sustenance
Paleo Naan Bread (Flatbread) by Swiss Paleo

 

Elle’s Mushroom Bourguignon with Venison for #ElleAPalooza

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Elle loved winter (almost!) as much as I do! She was a New Englander through and through and we had a shared love for snow and cold days where you need a bowl of something hot and steamy to warm yourself up. Since we are in the middle of winter, I wanted to make one of her warming stews for #EllaPalooza and quickly decided on her Mushroom Bourguignon recipe.

I looove mushrooms and so I have been wanting to make this recipe for a long time. Too bad I waited until now, when she is no longer here to tell her how much I loved it and what a creative genius cook she was one last time.

I added some venison steak strips to the dish to stretch it because I wanted to enjoy this soup over and over again. I don’t think the stew needs it at all, the mushrooms hold their own in this dish, but if you feel like being indulgent, add some, it is quite delicious that way.

Your whole house smells good as you are cooking this dish up and you can cook it like Julia Child – one glass of wine for the pot and one for the cook! Elle suggests serving this over egg noodles, but we served ours over mashed potatoes (for Roberto) and mashed rutabaga (for myself). We toasted to Elle and thanked her for being a part of our lives and ate this delicious warming stew in her memory. It made the Elle-shaped hole in my heart warm for a few minutes. I miss you Elle!

If you would like to join the food blogging community in supporting Elle’s family, please join Friends of Elle on facebook to learn more about the auction be held to benefit her family. It is also a place where you can share your thoughts about Elle and gather with friends old and new who all loved this beautiful woman.

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Crimini mushrooms, sliced
2 Portobello mushrooms, stems and gills removed, cut into chunks
1/3 pound of venison leg steaks cut into strips
olive oil
salt and pepper, to taste
1 pound carrots, peeled and cut diagonally into 1 inch pieces
1 large onion, diced
4 cloves garlic, minced
4 TBS tapioca flour
1cup dry red wine
2 cups broth of your choice-vegetable, chicken, beef
1 tbsp tomato paste
1 tsp dry thyme
1 tsp Herbes de Provence
2 bay leaves

METHOD: In a large pot, heat about 2-3 tbsp of olive oil. Add all of the mushrooms, the venison strips, about 1 1/2 tsp of salt and 1 tsp of pepper, and sauté for about 10 minutes. Remove the mushrooms, venison and accumulated juices to a bowl and set aside.

Add a couple more tbsp of olive oil, and sauté the onions and carrots for about 10 more minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and cook for one more minute.

Sprinkle the onions, carrots and garlic with the tapioca flour, stir for about 2-3 minutes. Add the mushrooms and accumulated juices back to the pot, then add the wine, broth, tomato paste, thyme, Herbes de Provence and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Stir occasionally.

Duck Schnitzel with Rødkål and Mustard Potatoes (gluten free)

duckschnitzel

 

Making gluten-free duck schnitzel is simple, but it is such a treat! Recently I was the happy recipient of some wild duck and goose breasts. My friend’s son is a prolific hunter and needed someone to give some meat to, so I was happy to oblige.

I made sure to pound the duck breasts so they were very thin and decided to serve it with traditional cabbage and potato accompaniments. Rødkål is a sweet and sour cabbage dish from Denmark and I did my own version of a hot German potato salad using hot potatoes and adding some mustard for an extra lift of flavor. Both vegetables went perfectly with the schnitzel and it was one of the best dinners I had cooked in a while. The best part was how quick and easy the dishes were to make!

Next time you have some duck breasts, give this a try or if you can’t easily come by duck breasts, try the classic Weiner Schnitzel which uses pounded veal cutlets, pork is also good.

Duck Breast Schnitzel

INGREDIENTS:

4 duck breasts pounded thin
2 large eggs, scrambled
3/4  cup of gluten-free bread crumbs
1 tsp salt
1 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp sweet Hungarian paprika
2 TBS good quality butter
Lemon wedges

METHOD: Pound the duck breasts out nice and thin. Scramble an egg in a shallow bowl and in another shallow bowl mix the breadcrumbs with the salt and spices. Place a skillet on the burner on medium-high heat and melt the butter.

Dip each duck breast first into the egg and then coat it well with the spiced breadcrumbs. Then place both duck breasts into the melted butter and cook on each side until the coating is browned and crisp – about 2 minutes on each side. Serve with lemon wedges.

Rødkål

INGREDIENTS:

3 ½ cups shredded red cabbage
1 small onion thinly sliced
2 TBS good butter
2 TBS apple cider vinegar
¼ cup of lingonberry or red currant jam
salt & pepper
1 ½ tsp Beau Monde- allspice, bay, cinnamon, cloves, mace, nutmeg, black and white pepper
½ cup water

METHOD: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a skillet over medium heat melt the butter. Add the cabbage and onion and some salt and sweat the cabbage and onions. When they begin to soften mix in the vinegar, jam, spices and water and bring to a simmer. Simmer with a lid on for about 40 minutes; add more water if it is getting dry.

Mustard Potatoes

INGREDIENTS:

5 medium sized yellow potatoes, boiled al dente and roughly chopped.
4 strips of bacon, diced
1 small onion, diced
1 clove of garlic, diced
1 TBS apple cider vinegar
1 tsp dried thyme
¼ cup Dijon mustard

METHOD:
Preheat oven to 350 F. Boil potatoes until tender, about 20 minutes and set aside. In a skillet sauté the bacon, onion and garlic. Roughly chop potaotes and place in a baking dish. Add the bacon mixture, apple cider vinegar, thyme and mustard. Stir to thoroughly coat the potatoes, then bake for about 20 minutes.

Post Partum Freezer Meals: Russian Borscht

 

2013-12-05_Borscht_Mashers

I loooove borscht. The first time I ever made it I was over run with beets from my CSA. This was in college and we had an agriculture program there and if you lived on campus (or off) your could buy a CSA share. This was the first time I had ever heard of a CSA by the way and I thought it was very cool and it taught me to cook lots of different kinds of produce I wasn’t used to.

So I was in my on campus apartment making dinner for my housemates. Everything in the kitchen was red, including my hands and my shirt. I loved the experience. Ever since then, I have been hooked. In fact during my pregnancy I had a dream while napping of eating borscht, so my husband made it for me. Since I love it so much, I figured it would be a perfect addition to my postpartum menu. I used beets that we had grown in our garden the year before that were roasted and then frozen. Definitely handy for a borscht lover.

This soup is restorative, comforting and deeply nourishing. Since I am such a borscht fanatic, I asked my friend and fellow blogger Sofya, who blogs at A Girl’s Guide to Guns and Butter for her recipe. She is from Azerbaijan and that being a former Soviet republic, I figured she would have a truly authentic recipe. Her recipe begins with making homemade beef bone broth which is the base of the soup. This is truly delicious comfort food.

This borscht is the best! In fact I am eating some right now. Today I served it over mashed potatoes with some fresh sauerkraut on top. In my version I was lazy and I cubed all my veggies instead of grating them. But I guess you can’t blame me for taking a short cut, I was 9 months pregnant when I made it! I hope you make some and enjoy it during the cold, cold days of winter.

Russian Borscht Recipe by Sofya Hunt

Makes approximately 7 to 8 quarts

INGREDIENTS:

For the stock:

2 roasts, such as chuck or arm, 2 to 3 lbs each, or 4 to 6 lbs soup bones (or some combination of both)
2 gallons cold water
1 whole turnip, unpeeled
1 whole large onion, peeled and studded with 10-12 cloves
2 large carrots, unpeeled
1/2 celeriac, peeled
2 large bay leaves
10 dried allspice berries

For the soup:

12 medium beets
1 medium head of cabbage, shredded (do not use the core)
2 small to medium unpeeled turnips, grated
2 medium to large unpeeled parsnips, grated
4-6 unpeeled carrots, grated
1/2 celeriac, peeled and grated
2 large onions, chopped
2 potatoes, cubed
3 sticks of butter, for sauteing the vegetables
2/3 to 1 whole 8-oz can tomato paste
meat reserved from making the stock, cubed
1 whole head of garlic, cloves peeled and minced
organic beef base, or an equivalent
additional water or stock, as needed
lemon juice, to taste
salt and black pepper, to taste
1 bunch parsley, chopped
sour cream and extra parsley, for serving

The Stock

Place meat and vegetables in cold water and bring to a simmer. Skim off the scum that will rise to the top just before the simmering point. Once the stock is simmering, add bay leaf and allspice. Cover partially and simmer for 2 to 3 hours, or until the meat is fork-tender and the liquid had been reduced by at least half. Let cool and strain, reserving the meat and discarding the vegetables and spices. Note that I don’t degrease my stock, but if you’d like to do it, chill it in the fridge overnight and use a slotted spoon to remove solidified fat from the surface in the morning.

The Soup

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Wrap the beets tightly in foil and pierce the packages (the foil and the beets) with a fork in several places to allow some of the steam to escape, thus preventing them from exploding in your oven. Place on a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper and roast for for 1 to 1.5 hours, or until a knife can be slid easily in and out. Remove from the oven, allow to cool, and unwrap. To peel them easily, hold each beet under warm running water while rubbing it with your hands – the skins will slip right off. Grate cooled beets and set aside.

Melt butter in a large stainless steel saute pan or a dutch oven (don’t be taken aback by the amount of butter – it will all be absorbed by the veggies before you know it). When the butter begins to foam, add grated parsnips, turnips, carrots, celeriac, and chopped onion and saute until the onions are translucent and the root vegetables begin to soften. Reduce the heat to low and stir in tomato paste. Set aside.

Bring strained stock to a boil and add the cabbage and the cubed potatoes. Reduce to a simmer and simmer for 10 minutes. Add sauteed root vegetables and 3/4 of grated beets (we’ll be adding the rest towards the end for additional color boost). Continue simmering gently, partially covered, for 40 minutes. If your soup appears too thick at this point, feel free to add more water or extra stock until the consistency is right. If using homemade stock, add beef base (do not add extra salt until you are done adding beef base as it tends to be very salty on its own). Stir in the remaining beets, cubed meat, minced garlic, pepper, lemon juice, and more salt if needed (the exact amount of lemon juice will depend on your taste, but the goal is to strike a perfect balance between sweetness and acidity so your borscht is neither too sour, nor too sweet). Simmer for another 10 to 15 minutes, or until the beets are no longer dark-red and the garlic has mellowed out. Remove from heat and stir in the parsley.

Let cool and refrigerate overnight before serving the next day.